Coulda Shoulda Woulda

This fall, two exciting plays premier at the newly-renovated Public Theater

Present circumstances being what they are, the thumb of theater-words isn’t as closely bound to the pulse of New York theater as it usually is. So what are we most bummed about missing this fall season? Achem…

1. Sorry, at the Public Theater. The third entry of Richard Nelson’s remarkable “Apple Plays,” Sorry takes us back to the now-beloved Apple family in Rhinebeck, NY for an evening of taut, unprepossessing drama. Just like it’s two predecessors (That Hopey Changey Thing and Sweet and Sad), Sorry is an “up-to-the-second” play taking place on election night, 2012. The first two plays about the family were delivered with breathtaking intimacy and honesty; there’s every reason to believe that Sorry will continue the trend.

2. The Whale, at Playwrights Horizons. The is a tale of a six-hundred pound dude, his estranged daughter, and a young angry Mormon—all sure-to-be-potent ingredients when Samuel Hunter is the playwright and Davis McCallum is the director. And hey, there’s the thrilling prospect of watching Shuler Hensley wear a monstrously large fat suit.

3. Fun Homeat the Public Theater. Oh, agony of agonies to miss this one. theater-words has been keeping tabs on this new musical for quite some time, so its continued development is especially exciting. But to miss its premiere… oh dear. Why the enthusiasm? Fun Home was first published as a singularly brilliant graphic memoir by the peerless Alison Bechdel; the family drama therein was pretty much beyond compare. Adapted by Jeanine Tesori and Lisa KronFun Home is the kind of story that makes you knock your forehead: “Of course! What a perfect idea for a musical!” Director Sam Gold is the bee’s knees in pretty much everything he does, and will doubtlessly deliver an intelligent and sensitive production.

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There are, of course, plenty of other shows worth being excited about (here’s looking at you, The Heiress, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?and The Mystery of Edwin Drood, to name a few) but in terms of very-limited runs, for my money it’s gonna be hard to beat the three above picks.

Do you plan on seeing any of these titles? What are your thoughts? And, post-performance, how were they?

The Best of 2011!

Lay on the eggnog! Toss the confetti! It’s time for the 2011 superlatives! Huzzah! This year’s winners of the internationally renowned theater-words awards are listed below, roughly in the order they opened.

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BEST CASE FOR THE SURVIVAL OF THE WELL-MADE PLAY:

Good People, MTC/Broadway

Here’s how it goes: There’s an interesting lead character who wants something that she has to fight hard to get. A shocking setup, I know, but we Aristotelians in the audience at David Lindsay-Abaire’s latest were giddy at the elegance and payoff of this perfectly crafted and relevant class drama.

BEST REMINDER THAT TONY KUSHNER ROCKS AND TOTALLY DOESN’T CARE ABOUT NON-COMMERCIAL TITLES:

The Intelligent Homosexual’s Guide to Capitalism and Socialism with a Key to the Scriptures, the Public Theater

Mr. Angels in America’s four-hour behemoth stood proudly on its own, complicated terms: Spectacularly performed and directed, it simultaneously made you uncomfortable and blissed out—not exactly an easy combination.

[Read more…]

Sweet and Sad and Cheap

You know that wonderful relief you feel settling into a new episode of a favorite TV show? That’s the sensation I got at the Public’s Sweet and Sad, a real-time sequel to last year’s That Hopey Changey Thing. “It’s the Apple family!” you think with a smile. “My how I’ve missed them!” (Both plays are by Richard Nelson.)

Hopey Changey was “about” the 2010 midterm elections, Sweet is “about” the tenth 9/11 anniversary, but what makes the plays wonderful is the fully-realized characters and the episodic pleasure that comes with returning to them. Fortunately for us, the entire cast of these two “Apple Family Plays” has remained the same. Their super-naturalistic performances were great then, and they’re great now.

And all for $15? Who’s knows how the Public is managing that one, but their LAB series officially makes theatergoing cheaper than the movies.

Fingers crossed the Apples are back next year, too!

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